mercredi 30 décembre 2009

Interview avec Scott Parazynski, astronaute de la NASA qui a effectué 5 missions en navette spatiale lors de STS-66, 86, 95, 100 et 120

Scott Parzaynski, médecin de formation, est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1992 dans le Groupe 14. Il effectue 5 missions à bord de la Navette Spatiale (STS-66, 86, 95, 100 et 120). Il quitte la NASA en 2009. Toujours en 2009, il réalise l'ascension de l'Everest (après un échec en 2008)
Il a son propre site internet : http://www.parazynski.com/
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program before your 1st flight ?
A : I was very fortunate to wait just 2 years from selection to first flight --- the first year spent as Astronaut Candidate, and then almost immediatly transitioning to STS-66 training (including two of my Class of 1992 crewmates, Joe Tanner and Jean-Francois Clervoy)
Q : How did you feel prior the flight ?
A : I felt well trained, but somewhat apprehensive beofre my first flight. I wanted to perform well, and there were so many unknows : how would I feet ? Would I have Space Motion Sickness ? You can only simulate so much on Earth --- so the first time in space is a very big life experience.
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during the take-off ?
A : I was on the flight deck in teh MS1 seat, so I had a great view out the forward AND overhead windows. I remember having a mirror positioned on my knee, and I was therefore able to see the waves crashing on the beach below as Atlantis performed its roll maneuver to a heads-down position --- and then nothing the clouds getting progressively smaller as we rushed to space. Lots of vibration and adrenalin these 8.5 minutes...
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : Weightlessness is a beautiful sensation, very similar to being submerged on a SCUBA dive with your buoyancy compensator perfectly adjusted, such that you neither float up nor sink down. Pushing off with fingertips allow you to fly like Buzz Lightyear wherever you desire, and the views are more beautiful than any photo can capture. I concentrated on doing the best very job I could, but also thought about home quite a bit : I want to memorize the experience, such that I could share the experience with my family and friends.
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : Most of my missions were ''textbook'', thanksfully, although they were complicated operations. The one significant exception was during STS-120, when we had to go out and repair a live solar array. There's some additional information on my website, www.parazynski.com. I'm very proud of how the entire team, Mission Control and our on-orbit crew, handled the very serious challenge before us.
Q : What did you eat, and did it taste real ?
A : I've always had a great apetite, so the ''camping'' rehydratable food was just fine; We also had a Frenchman aboard, so we had a few treats from France to round out our menu. On my subsequent flights I always had International Partner astronaut with me, so I've had dined on French, Italian, Russian, Japanese, spanish and Canadian specialties in space...
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : Reentry on STS-66 (my first flight) was very eye-opening, as I was on the middeck with Ellen Ochoa and just a wall of lockers in front of us. We had M&M's with us, and would toss them gently upwards and try to guess the g-level we were experiencing. The guys on the flight deck would tell us we were almost always right on... And then slowing down through the speed of sound the whole vibrated like a train running out of control, thanksfully, smoothing out shortly thereafter. We felt really heavy, almost like a 100 years-old man, having to carry our body weight and spacesuit for the first time in 11 days...
Q : Were you glad to be back on Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I loved space, and would be thrilled to go back. That said, everything and everyone I love was back on Earth --- So I could'nt have stayed up there forever. I was anxious to get back home and share the experience with others !

mardi 29 décembre 2009

Interview avec Duane ''Digger'' Carey, astronaute et pilote de la navette spatiale lors de la mission STS-109



Duane ''Digger'' Carey est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1996 dans le Groupe 16. 
Ancien pilote d'essai de l'US Air Force, il est le pilote de la navette spatiale lors de la mission STS-109, mission de maintenance du télescope spatial Hubble. 
Il quitte la NASA en 2004. 
Actuellement, il est consultant. Véritable amoureux de la moto, il a fait le tour des USA et envisage de faire le tour du monde à moto.

Il a son propre site internet : http://www.astronautbiker.com/


Interview réalisée en 2009

How many years were you connected to the space program prior to your flight ?
You can find my bio at http://www.astronautbiker.com/. I was selected by NASA in 1996 and I flew my mission in Space (STS-109) in March of 2002.

How did you feel prior to the flight ?
Excited and a bit scared. 
I was not nervous, however. We had trained so hard that I had a great confidence in my crew and myself.
I was ready to go...there was no stopping us !


What kinds of sensations did you experienced during take-off ?
As the Pilot, I was busy during the lift-off. I did, however, indulge in a small, selfish though about 20 seconds before main engine ignition : ''Man, I hope everything works''. 
The initial movement at liftoff was quiete gentle. That ended in a few seconds, however, when the big solids started to vibrate and blur my vision a bit. It was not real noisy in cockpit... I could hear a fair amount of wind noise about 100 knots or so either side of the mach.

What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you thing about during the flight ?
The whole weightless thing was a bit unpleasant for me at first. 
On our third day in Space, it got very pleasant... very relaxing. 
As far as what I thought about, I was very busy supporting our mission and that process dominated my thoughts during the entire flight.


What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
Our spacehip had a potentially serious problem that we noticed shortly after attaining orbit. The cooling system was compromised. However, our team on the ground worked overtime and determinated that we could complete our mission safely. 
Other than that, I encountered no real problems during the conduct of my duties.
(Lors du décollage, la fuite a littéralement ''embrasé'' les nuages)
(Hubble vue depuis la navette spatiale lors de la mission STS-109)
What did you eat, and did it taste real ?
I ate the typical space food. 
It taste fine, but I did not eat much of my food. I was so busy that I could not find the time to eat properly. I lost a few pounds during the mission.

What was Re-entry like ?
Scary and fun... 
Scary because I could see the plasma cloud outside the windows. Fun because the experience was somewhat akin to flying a regular airplane... except we were much higher and faster that I've never been in a conventional airplane.

(Duane Carey caresse le nez de Columbia après l'atterrissage)
Were you glad to be back Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
I was happy to be back on Eath. 
Another astronaut once said that only 10% of all people would be happy living of the surface of the Earth. 
When I was younger, I'd have gladly signed on the living on Mars, for instance, for the rest of my life. I'm older now, and when I was in Space, I missed the Earth. 
I'd love to go to back to space for 2-3 weeks holidays, however, if I could ride motorcycles on another planet, however, I might change my mind about living there for the rest of my life !

(vue depuis le cockpit de Columbia)
(Tableau acrylique sur toile de Pierre-Marie Valat)
Crédit : Collection Stéphane Sebile / Spacemen1969
            Space Quotes - Souvenirs d'espace
            NASA

Interview avec Charles Camarda, astronaute de la NASA, astronaute de la mission STS-114

Charles Camarda est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1996 dans le groupe 16. Docteur en Ingénierie Aérospatiale, il vole sur la mission STS-114 qui marque le retour en vol des navettes spatiales après l'accident de Columbia.
Il est actuellement responsable du NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC).
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program before your flight ?
A : I have been connected with the space flight program over 22 years prior to my selection as astronaut. I began working for NASA's Langley research Center in 1974.
Q : How did you feel prior to the flight ?
A : I was very relaxated prior to launch because I felt I was very well prepared thanks to the multitude of the great trainers and support personnel and the hundreds of hour of simulations for our mission.
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during take-off ?
A : It was pure excitement and exhilaration ! I think I was laughing and trying to jump out of my seat for the entire 8 minutes (of course I was on the middeck during launch and so my job was to sit back and enjoy)
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : Weightlessness for extanded periods of time is a fun experience. Within hours to days it becomes second nature and tasks which seems difficult at first, quickly become routine. Since we were the first mission to space after Columbia accident, we had a very pack schedule of work, as is the case for the most shuttle missions. During the first several days my mind was totally on my job and my family. In the evenings we had some quiet time to gaze out windows and reflect. These were the times I felt very blessed to have a wonderful family, friends and colleagues helped me achieve my dream. It was a spiritual time.
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : 1) Immediatly after liftoff our vehicule struck a very large buzzard, a flock of which was circling overhead prior to liftoff. We were very lucky it did not strike the Orbiter because it could have very easily caused critical damage.
2) Prior to docking the crew onboard the ISS photographed was turned out to be two gapfillers protruding from the forward section of the undersurface of the vehicule. Thanks to the experts researchers at the NASA Ames and NASA LaRC who conducted computational fluid dynamic analyses and predicted these protuding gapfillers could cause overheating of the wing leading edges during entry, the ground team at NASA orchestrated a spacewalk which we put in work to remove both gap fillers.
Q : What did you eat, and did it taste real ?
A : I ate very well in space, in fact, I thing I gained Weight ! Crewmate Soichi Noguchi had some great japanese food wich he shared with the crew. The curried chicken was out of the world (literatally and figuratively)
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : Earth entry was a little more stressful this flight, especially for our families, since the Columbia tragedy occured during entry due to debris damage from ET foam during launch. The 15 minutes during high heating during the entry trajectory were especially intense.
Q : Were you glad to be back Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I was very glad to be back to thank the thousands of people on the ground who supported our mission and ensured our safety and sussess and to see my family who I knew were especially concerned and awaiting our safe return.

Interview avec Bryan O'Connor, astronaute et Pilote / Commandant de la navette spatiale lors des missions STS-61B et STS-40

Bryan O'Connor est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1980 dans le groupe 9. Ancien pilote d'essai de l'US Marine Corps, il a effectué 2 missions spatiales. STS-61B en tant que pilote et STS-40 en tant que Commandant. Il quitte le corps actif en 1991. Actuellement, administrateur-Adjoint de la NASA.
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program prior your first flight ?
A : 5 years.
Q : How did you feel prior to the flight ?
A : I felt confident about my training. But since it was my first flight, I was little nervous about the unknows.
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during the take-off ?
A : Lots of noise and vibrations during the first minute, then very smooth although the ''g'' forces slowly incrased to ''3g'' making me feel heavy.
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : Weightlessness is a wonderful experience. It is pleasant to be free of gravity's pull.
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fix them ?
A : We had very few problems on the flight. One that was interesting was a torn payload bay door seal. For several hours, while Mission Control Houston analysed the problem, we thought we might have to do a spacewalk to repair the seal. In the end, we entered with the seal torn and there was no problem.
Q : What did you eat, and did it taste real ?
A : We ate pretty normal food which we had rehydrated. It taste good but I used some hot sauce to improve it. The coffee was not very good, so I didn't drint it, and I got a ''caffeine headache''.
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : Entry was not nearly as exciting as ascent. It was a long slow, smooth flight, with the ''g'' forces lower than launch. As we turned on final approach, thow, we saw a cloud in the way, and we could not see the runaway until passing 6000 feet. That was interesting but no problem... the instruments very accurate, and when we came out of the cloud, wwe were right where we were supposed to be.
Q : Were you glad to back on earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I was glad to be home. We accomplished our mission, so I was ready to come back.

lundi 28 décembre 2009

Rencontre avec Scott Crossfield, légendaire pilote d'essai américain qui a volé sur la plupart des avions expérimentaux des années 40-60

Scott Crossfield est un pilote d'essai américain. Il rejoint le NACA (ancêtre de la NASA) en 1950 avec lequel il pilotera le X-1, X-4, X-5, XF-92A, le D-558-I et D-558-II. Il totalisera 87 vols en propulsion-fusée avec le X-1 et D-558-II.
Il entre dans l'histoire aéronautique en devenant le premier homme à Mach 2 le 20 novembre 1953 avec le D-558-II.
Il quitte le NACA en 1955 pour rejoindre North American Aviation qui venait de gagner le contrat de construction du X-15. Il sera le chef-pilote d'essai du début du programme X-15 pour North American Aviation.
Il effectue le 1er vol du X-15 en 1959...Il volera sur 2 des 3 prototypes du X-15 (14 vols et 16 vols captifs).
En 1960, il publie son autobiographie "Always Another Down. The Story of a Rocket Test Pilot" (qui deviendra une version abrégée intitulée X-15 en France chez France-Empire).
Il travaille encore chez North American sur le Programme Apollo puis rejoindra Eastern Airlines en 1967. Il prend sa retraite en 1977 et devient consultant.
Il meurt accidentellement dans le crash de son avion personnel en avril 2006 à l'âge de 84 ans.
Souvenirs de sa carrière recueillis aux USA en 2003.
Q : Quand et comment vous êtes passionné pour l'aviation et avez-vous décidé de devenir pilote ?
A : J'ai commencé à voler vers 12 ans. Je passais tous mes temps libres à l'aérodrome du coin. Je faisais toutes sortes de petits boulots et la récompense était de voler. Mais je ne voulais pas que piloter, je voulais aussi comprendre pourquoi et comment un avion volait. Je décide de passer un diplôme d'ingénieur à l'Université. La guerre arrive et je rejoint la Navy. Je deviens intructeur de vol (sur Corsair notamment). Après la guerre, je fais partie de la Patrouille Acrobatique de la Navy sur Corsair. Puis reprends mes études d'ingénieur. Je rejoins finalement le NACA.
Q : Durant votre carrière de pilote au NACA, qu'est-ce qui vous a le plus ''amusé'' à piloter ?
R : (rires). J'ai vraiment aimé piloter tous ces avions mais ce qui m'a le plus amusé et qui est le plus inoubliable, c'est les journées chargées qui faisaient que je pilotais plusieurs avions totalement différents dans la journée... Le planning était serré et il y avait des retard. Et pour les combler, je devais piloter, par exemple, un X-1 de bonne heure le matin, puis un X-4 à l'heure du déjeuner et terminer la journée par un vol en D-558-II. Ce type de journée était fatiguante pour moi, stressante et harassante pour l'équipe au sol, mais réellement excitante...
Q : Comment arriviez-vous à gérer mentalement le passage de l'un à l'autre ? Le X-1 et le D-558-II ne se pilotent pas tout à fait pareil...
A : C'est vrai que les caractéristiques de vol de ces 2 avions ne sont pas identiques, mais c'étaient de bons avions quand même... Pas parfait mais cela facilitait les choses. On est concentré sur le pilotage donc on a pas le temps de penser à autre chose.
Q : Qu'avez-vous ressenti après avoir franchi Mach 2 pour la première fois avec le D-558-II ?
A : Je laisse mes émotions au sol quand je vole. La concentration sur le pilotage est très importante. C'est cela qui nous aide à nous sortir de situations périlleuses... J'ai eu pas mal de soucis en vol avec les avions expérimentaux,et seule la concentration du pilotage m'a aidée, et un peu de chance aussi (Rires...). Mais arrivé au sol, j'étais content... Non pas d'être le premier homme à Mach 2 mais content pour le programme et toutes les personnes qui travaillaient dessus. C'est l'aboutissement de nombreuses années de travail...
Q : Que pouvez-vous me dire sur le x-15 et sur le pilote de X-15 que vous avez été ?
A : Le X-15 était un avion formidable... Superbe, très beau... mais comme toutes les stars, capricieux et difficile (Rires...). J'ai rejoins North American Aviation uniquement pour le piloter, être le premier... Imaginez que l'on parlait d'un réacteur de 75 000 pounds et qu'on posait un fuselage dessus avec un pilote... Quel challenge... Puis surtout je voulais participer à l'élaboration de l'avion depuis le début. En 1955, ce n'était qu'une ébauche sur un papier... en 1959, il volait... Des années de travail, mais un beau résultat, vous ne trouvez pas (Rires...).

Interview avec Joseph ''Joe'' Tanner, astronaute de la NASA qui a effectué 4 missions à bord de la navette spatiale lors de STS-66, 82, 97 et 115

Jospeh ''Joe'' Jones est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1992 dans le Groupe 14. Ingénieur aérospatial, il a effectué 4 missions spatiales en tant que Mission Specialist (STS-66, 82, 97 et 115) avant de quitter la NASA en 2008. Actuellement, il enseigne à l'Université du Colorado.
Interview réalisé en 2008
Q : How many years were you connected with the space program before your 1st spaceflight ?
A : 10 years and 4 months (Research Pilot at JSC)
Q : How did you feel prior to the flight ?
A : I was excited, and little nervous
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during take-off ?
A : Nothing I hadn't trained for or expected. It was emotional to finally go
Q : What was weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : Just like being under water. I thought about how lucky and blessed I was to be there
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : We had very few problems. All were covered by our procedures
Q : What did you eat and did it taste real ?
A : The food was like normal food but did not taste great. Our taste buds do not work well
Q : What was re-entry like ?
A : Very easy with a gradual return to normal gravity. I felt heavy

dimanche 27 décembre 2009

Interview avec Thomas ''Tom'' Jones, astronaute de la NASA qui a effectué 4 missions à bord de la navette spatiale lors de STS-59, 68, 80 et 98

Thomas ''Tom'' Jones est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1990 dans le Groupe 13. Ancien pilote de l'US Air Force (pilote de B-52D Stratofortress), il passe un doctorat de Science Planétaire après avoir quitté l'USAF.
Il a effectué 4 missions spatiales en tant que Mission Specialist (STS-59, 68, 80 et 98) avant de quitter la NASA en 2001. Il a effectué 3 EVA lors de ses missions.
Actuellement consultant et écrivain.
Il a écrit en 2006 SKY WALKING, ses mémoires. C'est le livre dont il fait référence au cours de cette interview
Il a également son propre site internet
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program before your 1st flight ?
A : See details in my book ''Sky Walking'' at my website : http://www.astronauttomjones.com/. Researcher since 1985, joined NASA in 1990. First flight in 1994.
Q : How did you feel prior the flight ?
A : Eager to go, prepared, but nervous about whether I would be able to perform well in the space environment.
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during take-off ?
A : See ''Sky Walking'' -- tremendous sense of acceleration, at being hurled into space by a marvelous machine.
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about the flight ?
A : During relaxed moments, it feel like floating on your back in a deep pool of warm water. Getting the job was my 1st priority. The view is what I enjoyed consistently.
Q : What were some of the problems have you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : See ''Sky Walking''. Few problems; most were ably solved by the ground team. Our biggest worry for the first few days was a water system that ingested cabin air and mix air bubbles with our water. Not very good for the digestion.
Q : What did you eat, and did it taste real ?
A : Favourite entree : ''Fiesta Chicken'' -- Thermo-stabilized chicken in a spicy salsa sauce. Very good
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : See ''Sky Walking'' for details, but I very much enjoyed the spectacular light show of the plasma wrapped around the shuttle, and the anticipation of our landing back home, with our families watching.
Q : Were you glad to be back on Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I enjoyed returning to Earth. Space travel is a hard work ! I needed a vacation !

mercredi 23 décembre 2009

Interview avec Brian Duffy, astronaute et Pilote / Commandant de la navette spatiale lors des missions STS-45, 57, 72 et 92

Brian DUFFY est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1985 dans le groupe 11. Ancien pilote d'essai de l'US Air Force, il a effectué 4 missions spatiales dont 2 en tant que Commandant (dont le 100ème vol d'une navette).
Actuellement responsable du Programme Altaïr (le futur alunisseur) chez Lockheed Martin
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program before your 1st flight ?
A : I'd been at NASA for nearly 7 years before I flew the first time.
Q : How did you feel prior the flight ?
A : Very excited at the thought of leaving the planet, and I felt lucky and privileged to be doing what I was doing.
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during the take-off ?
A : Amazing acceleration that didn't stop. The g's varied during the profile, but they were very impressive.
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : It feels pretty normal, particularly after being in space for a couple of days. I loved looking at Earth and I thought of my family quite a bit.
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : No real problems on my first flight, just routine things.
Q : What did you eat and did it taste real ?
A : We choose our own menu and it differs by meal and by day. I enjoyed the food, particularly the shrimp cocktail because it was very spicy.
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : Coming back in to land is like nothing you've ever seen or done......it's surreal what you see and feel.
Q : Were you glad to be back on Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I was glad to be back to see my family, but anxious to go again (which I did 3 more times). I'd go back to space in a minute.

mercredi 16 décembre 2009

RENCONTRE AVEC JOHN YOUNG, astronaute et Moonwalker / Gemini 3, 10 - Apollo 10, 16 et STS-1, 9

On ne présente plus un des plus célèbres astronautes au monde... Une carrière de 40 ans à la NASA... Un destin spatial exceptionnel et hors du commun.
6 vols spatiaux à son actif. 2 voyages vers la Lune dont un où il ''campera'' 3 jours. Il est le commandant de la première mission de la navette spatiale.
Les questions ont été posées en français et les réponses ont été traduites par mon grand-père lors de ma première rencontre avec John Young lors de sa visite au Salon du Bourget.
Q : Au décollage, quelles différences y-a t-il entre un décollage de navette (STS-1), d'une Saturn V (Apollo 10 et 16) et d'une Titan (Gemini 3 et 10) ?
R : Lors d'un décollage de navette, cela vibre beaucoup moins... La Saturn V mettait plus de temps pour décoller, presque au ralenti pour quitter le sol... Nous encaissions 4-5g. Avec la navette, nous encaissons environ 3g. La navette est étudiée pour que des personnes en bonne condition physique puisse aller dans l'espace même si elles ne sont pas astronautes de métier.
La Saturn V mettait environ 12 minutes pour vous mettre en orbite contre 8 pour la navette. Malgré son imposante taille, la Saturn V n'accélérait pas aussi vite que la navette...
Mais elle était tres bruyante. Nous entendions très difficilement le Control Center... Et comme je le disais, cela vibrait beaucoup plus que dans la navette, beaucoup plus... Il était très difficile de lire les cadrans.
La Titan, elle, vibrait aussi beaucoup et nous encaissions 6-7g au décollage à cause du rapport poussée/poids.
Q : Vous qui avez eu la chance de piloter le Module de Commande et le LEM, qu'avez vous préférer piloter ?
R : Le LEM bien sûr (rires) car cela voulait dire que j'allais enfin sur la Lune (rires)...
Piloter le LEM c'est un peu piloter un hélicoptère... Très complexe et difficile à piloter, mais plus ''intéressant'' que le Module de Commande où énormément de manoeuvres et d'opérations étaient un peu plus automatique... Beaucoup de phases de vol en Module de Commande pourraient se comparer à du vol de nuit en avion, vol sans instruments... Mais lors de manoeuvres complexes, nous prenions nos mesures visuellement sur les étoiles...pour ne pas nous tromper dans nos alignements
Q : Quels souvenirs gardez-vous de votre périple sur la Lune ?
R : Nous avons eu, jusqu'à pratiquement l'alunissage, plein de problèmes techniques. Le contrôle au sol a même pensé, à un moment, annuler l'alunissage (problème d'allumage secours du moteur du LEM)... Mais finalement, nous avons été jusqu'au bout, et nous avons accompli une extraordinaire mission...
Dormir sur la Lune a été très cool. Beaucoup plus agréable qu'en apesanteur totale.
Conduire la Jeep sur la Lune a été aussi un grand moment. C'est comme conduire un voiture sur la glace. Si on ne fait pas attention, on dérape très vite et on se retrouve dans l'autre sens.
Puis surtout, sauter sur la Lune... Jumper était très rigolo. Même avec nos combinaisons pleines, on pouvait sauter très haut. Regardes la photo que tu m'as amenée, tu verras que je saute très haut quand je salue sur la Lune.
Q : Quelle a été votre réaction lorsque vous avez appris que vous iriez marcher sur la Lune ?
R : En fait, je n'ai pas beaucoup réagi... J'avais déjà été vers la Lune (rires...) et lorsque l'équipage d'Apollo 13 a été sélectionné, j'étais la doublure de James Lovell. Donc pas de surprises... La rotation faisait que j'embarquerai vers la Lune et marcherai dessus... Ce n'est qu'avec l'approche du lancement que j'ai commencé à me dire que je vivais une expérience extraordinaire comme pilote.
Merci John Young
Depuis, j'ai rencontré 4 autres fois John Young... Et je l'adore toujours autant

mardi 8 décembre 2009

Interview avec Ken Cockrell, astronaute et Pilote / Commandant de la navette spatiale lors des missions STS-56, 69, 80, 98 et 111


Kenneth ''Ken'' Taco COCKRELL est un astronaute de la NASA sélectionné en 1990 dans le groupe 13.

Ancien pilote d'essai de l'US Navy, il a effectué 5 missions spatiales dont 3 en tant que Commandant de mission (STS-56, STS-69, STS-80, STS-98 et STS-111).
Actuellement, responsable du Programme WF-57F de la NASA.

 

 
Interview réalisée en 2009
Q : How many years were you connected to the space program before your 1st flight ?
A : I worked as a NASA Pilot from 1987 until 1990. I as in astronaut training from 1990 until my first flight in 1993.
 
Q : How did you feel prior the flight ?
A : Excited and little nervous - I was hoping I would not forgot anything !
 
Q : What kinds of sensations did you experienced during the take-off ?
A : It's an exciting ride ! But I felt like I had seen it all before because of the excellent simulator training.
 
Q : What does weightlessness feel like, and what did you think about during the flight ?
A : It felts like you are flying ! Flying as you dreamed it as a child !
 
Q : What were some of the problems you encountered and how did you fixed them ?
A : We had one experiment that was getting too hot. We made a duct - a long tube - out of paper and plastic, which took air from the shuttle's air conditioning and blew it on the experiment.
 
Q : What did you eat and did it taste real ?
A : I ate dried fruits and meals that I put water in and then heated in the oven. I also ate ready-to-eat meals, the same as our soldiers eat. The taste was great !
 
Q : What was Re-entry like ?
A : Very smooth, but I felt very heavy after 9 days weightless.
 
Q : Were you glad to be back on Earth, or did you feel you could have spent the rest of your life up there ?
A : I loved the flight and I also loved coming home - And I was ready to go back as soon as possible !